My Testimony as a Pro Life Speaker Before the Texas Legislature

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Before you ask, I do plan on posting an account of what happened last Tuesday before the Texas House Committee on State Affairs as I testified in support of HB 2 as a Pro Life Speaker representing myself.  In the meantime, some have asked to read my testimony, so I have provided it, below.  You may also view the testimony by clicking this video link (you’ll need to adjust the viewer to right at 5 hrs and 1 minute into the video to see my part).

I support HB 2, however, there is one portion of the bill that concerns me greatly. I fear that by allowing a fetal abnormality exception in this bill, Texas is solidifying the terrible myth that my life is not to be provided as much protection as those without disabilities. The United States claims that all life is created equal, but by allowing the euthanasia of the disabled in the womb, we contradict our own declaration.

 

In January of 1980, my parents received the shock of their lives. Sonograms were not performed on a regular basis, and since there were no signs of problems, the delivering obstetrician even allowed me to be born breach. After my delivery, though, he made a snap decision based on my outward appearance that I might have been better off dead. He performed a minimal amount of work on me to make sure I could breath, and then left me in the corner of the room to die. He had no right to make that decision then, and we have no right to make that decision now.

 

The medical community claims to know much when it comes to the predictions based on a sonogram screen and other tests. However, I have encountered countless stories in my travels all over this country as a pro-life speaker where those predictions were blatantly untrue. From parents who were told their child would have Down’s Syndrome only to find out at birth that the diagnosis was incorrect, to a family at church who were told their baby would be stillborn…only to find a very much alive baby kicking and screaming at the time of delivery. We must be willing to admit that even with the proper education, training, and years of practice, that the medical community simply cannot, and will never, know everything. How then can we trust a diagnosis of a fetal abnormality?

 

This all boils down to one thing…is my life in a body without arms worth it? My parents would tell you that they were not prepared for my arrival in 1980, yet now, they would also say that they would change nothing. I have a beautiful wife of eight years, two amazing children, Hannah age 5 and Olivia who is 15 months old. I run two successful businesses here in the great state of Texas. I can type around 35 words a minute, write with my feet, and drive a van with my feet. More than that, my life can praise God in the unusual form that my body is in. When I arrive home, my kids will nearly tackle me as they do every time I return from speaking somewhere and there will be lots of hugs, giggles, and “I love you’s!” It is at that moment, I know that my life is worth it. I ask that you remove the fetal abnormality exception to allow many other potential lives with disabilities to show you how much they are worth as well.

 

I thank you for your time and the work you are doing to pass this bill that is of ultimate importance. Thanks, and may God bless you.

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